Friday, January 11, 2008

Sunshine and Rain



(I heart Psych.)


Things that made me upset this week:

The CW's views on the roles of young women in society, as featured on Wednesday episode of Gossip Girl (at 3:23).



If you can't see the video, of if The CW has snatched it off of YouTube, here's what the closeted attempted-rapist said to the recently-dethroned Queen B:

"You held a certain fascination when you were beautiful, delicate, and untouched. But now you’re like one of the Arabians my father used to own: Rode hard and put away wet. I don’t want you now and I don’t see why anyone else would."


As I told Carrie on South Dakota Dark, Chuck's pot needs to meet Blair's kettle.

Talk about "rode hard and put away wet." Or in his case, "put away in a gay closet." What Pandora's Box of STDs is that boy dragging around in his pants?


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What is wrong with Gloria Steinem?

. . . Gender is probably the most restricting force in American life, whether the question is who must be in the kitchen or who could be in the White House. This country is way down the list of countries electing women and, according to one study, it polarizes gender roles more than the average democracy.

That’s why the Iowa primary was following our historical pattern of making change. Black men were given the vote a half-century before women of any race were allowed to mark a ballot, and generally have ascended to positions of power, from the military to the boardroom, before any women (with the possible exception of obedient family members in the latter) . . .

. . . So why is the sex barrier not taken as seriously as the racial one? The reasons are as pervasive as the air we breathe: because sexism is still confused with nature as racism once was; because anything that affects males is seen as more serious than anything that affects “only” the female half of the human race; because children are still raised mostly by women (to put it mildly) so men especially tend to feel they are regressing to childhood when dealing with a powerful woman; because racism stereotyped black men as more “masculine” for so long that some white men find their presence to be masculinity-affirming (as long as there aren’t too many of them); and because there is still no “right” way to be a woman in public power without being considered a you-know-what . . .


No wonder so many progressive non-white women don't consider themselves feminists.

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I didn't know 30 Rock was on last night, and I missed it. :(

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Janet Jackson's video for her new single, "Feedback." I have been playing the song all day almost every day for the past month. But the video needs help. And more dancing.

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Things that made me happy this week:

My friend Chrissy saved this week's 30 Rock on her DVR, so now I can watch it this weekend.

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Psych is coming back tonight!

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I got a Hello Kitty calendar. It only took me a week to realize that I would need a new one for 2008.

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I'm sure some more good things happened, but I can't think of them at the moment.

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2 comments:

Stephanie said...

Ack! I HATE THAT SAYING! And I hate Chuck. I almost forgot that I hated him until that. Then I remembered. How could I forget even for a minute that he is the evil villian?

Bianca Reagan said...

Because he's the most entertaining actor on the show.